Porcelain, faience and glass

Though the collection of porcelain, faience and glass items includes only about 400 objects, it shows the diversity of techniques and forms that were used for the production and comprises both standard and rare pieces. The collection includes Russian and European porcelain of the XVIII-XX centuries such as tableware, vases and sculpture.

Dish decorated with the calendar of 1887 (main church feasts indicated), 1887

Kuznetsov Company,Tver,Russia

Exposition at Nikolay Durasov’s Palace in Liublino

Decorative vase, 1916

Imperial Porcelain Factory

Petrograd, Russia

Dish, end of the XIX — beginning of the XX century

Kornilov Brothers Company,Saint-Petersburg,Russia

Exposition at Nikolay Durasov’s Palace in Liublino

Milk jug, the 1810s – the 1820s

Popov Factory, Gorbunovo, Dmitrov district,MoscowRegion,Russia

Exposition at Nikolay Durasov’s Palace in Liublino

 

The collection includes items produced at the Imperial Porcelain Factory, Gardner, Popov, Kuznetsov, Kornilov Brothers factories and other Russian companies as well as Meissen and Vienne porcelain manufactories. Speaking of the collection that includes Russian and European faience and majolica items one cannot but mention a rare kumgan (turkic jar) produced by Gzhel (Moscow Region) masters in the second half of the XVIII century and a jug manufactured in England in 1812-1822 and devoted to the war of 1812.

Kvass jug, last third of the XVIII century

Exposition at Nikolay Durasov’s Palace in Liublino

Jug with a knob, 1812-1822

England

Exposition at Nikolay Durasov’s Palace in Liublino

The earliest dated items in the collection representing Russian and European glass are those made of green glass with colourful paintings manufactured at Russian glass factories in the first half of the XVIII century.

Glass jug, XVIII century

Milestones in the History of Kolomenskoye exposition
at the Front Gate of the Tsar’s Courtyard in Kolomenskoye

 

Items made of engraved glass and produced at the Imperial Porcelain Factory in St. Petersburg in the second half of the XVIII century (such as two goblets with a combination of emblems and monograms surrounded by a luxuriant ornament as well as a park landscape) testify to the high skill of Russian glassblowers.

Goblet, the 1730s

Saint-Petersburg Glass Factory

Milestones in the History of Kolomenskoye exposition
at the front gate of the Tsar’s Courtyard in Kolomenskoye

Goblet, the 1760s -1770s

Saint-Petersburg,Russia

Exposition at Nikolay Durasov’s Palace in Liublino

 

Items manufactured at German, Austrian and Hungarian factories represent the section of European glass.

Glass with a round cut foundation, 1830

Austria,Vienne

Exposition at Nikolay Durasov’s Palace in Liublino

Share to LiveJournal
Share to MyWorld
Share to Odnoklassniki